2nd IEEE EMBS Distinguished Lecturer Event at UIC

Distinguished Lecturer Dr. Theodore W. Berger gives a talk on hippocampal neural prosthesis for human memory

Recently, our Student Chapter had the pleasure of hosting Dr. Theodore Berger in our second annual Distinguished Lecturer Event. As a leading expert in the field of neural prosthetics, Dr. Berger was well-prepared to present his work on memory-supporting models. Following Dr. Berger’s talk, the audience, composed of both students and multi-disciplinary professors, had time to ask Dr. Berger about his work. In all, Dr. Berger’s visit to UIC was rewarding and interesting, and we were extremely happy to have the opportunity to welcome him and hear about his amazing work.

1st IEEE EMBS Distinguished Lecturer Event at UIC

Distinguished Lecturer Dr. Michael Friebe informs students on what he believes to be the
upcoming trends in the medical field

The IEEE EMBS Chapter at UIC hosted a Distinguished Lecturer Event on November 28, 2017. We were honored to host Dr. Michael Friebe, a man of many talents and accolades who is truly deserving of the position of distinguished lecturer. His presentation was focused on trends that will become popular in the medical device industry, such as machine learning and the Internet of Things, trends which the medical and scientific community generally agree will see exponential growth in the future and become a cornerstone of future healthcare policies and practices. He also spoke for a time on the current state of affairs regarding healthcare policies and practices, and how they must change if society as a whole desires a healthy population. Advances in technology that can make diagnoses at home would eliminate frequent trips to expensive healthcare professionals. In the instance that visiting a healthcare professional is necessary, such as in the case of an MRI or X-Ray procedure, artificial intelligence is making more accurate diagnoses than doctors. All these factors will greatly change the way we conduct medicine in the future, most likely for the better.

Our event brought in 60 participants, 7 of which were faculty members. Attendees came from the Colleges of Engineering and Medicine, with backgrounds in bioengineering and electrical engineering.

Wearable Technology for Sports Injuries

This team is working on a wearable device that can estimate tissue damage after impact to the body. This project was inspired by rock climbers falling and not feeling how severe an injury is initially after the impact. This device will allow rock climbers to know if it is safe to continue to climb in order to prevent further damage to tissue. It will also measure vitals for emergency medical services to treat the user faster. This device could be applicable to other sports.

Previous project lead: Kholoud Baste

BCI Robotic Arm

Brain Computer Interface (BCI) is a way for the brain to communicate with an external device. In this project we will be using brain waves to control a robotic arm. To collect the brain waves for analysis we are using a 3-D printed headset and an OpenBCI.

Previous project lead: Collin Dreilich

InMoov

The InMoov Android is an open source 3D-printed life-sized robot designed by the French sculptor Gael Langevin. This project’s objective is to assemble and program the android, as well as making modifications to the original design for ease of assembly and better functionality.

Previous project lead: Joe Striblen